Ear, Nose, Throat, & Allergy

What are Nasal Polyps? What???

Does your nose constantly feel stuffy or congested? Do you always feel like you have a cold that doesn’t go away? It’s possible that your symptoms may be related to nasal polyps. Nasal polyps are typically benign (noncancerous) “grape-like” growths that develop within the lining of the nasal passages or sinus cavities. Although the cause of nasal polyps is not always known, in many cases they are triggered by chronic inflammation/swelling of the nasal mucosa . Recurrent sinus infections, chronic sinus swelling (chronic sinusitis), and allergic rhinitis (allergies) can all cause inflammation/swelling in the nose. Another condition associated with nasal polyps is Samter’s triad. Samter’s triad is a condition characterized by asthma, aspirin sensitivity, and nasal polyps. This condition is thought to affect roughly 10% of nasal polyp patients. Nasal polyps can vary in size. Smaller polyps might not cause any symptoms while larger nasal polyps can completely obstruct the nasal passages and make it extremely difficult to breathe thru the nose. Typical complaints include nasal congestion, facial pressure, decreased sense of smell (hyposmia), runny nose (rhinorrhea), sneezing, and postnasal drip. Nasal polyps may be difficult to visualize in the nasal or sinus passages in many cases. A quick and painless in-office procedure called a nasal endoscopy can often identify nasal polyps and help to determine treatment options. During this procedure, a Ear Nose Throat physician will guide a thin, flexible endoscope into the nasal and sinus passages to help determine the presence and type of nasal polyps. Other abnormalities in the nose and sinuses can also be identified, such as a nasal septal deviation, enlarged adenoids, or sinus cysts. Sometimes a CT scan of the sinuses may be ordered to determine the exact size and location of the nasal polyps. If surgery is indicated to remove the nasal polyps, the CT scan can also be used to help facilitate image guided surgery to improve accuracy and decrease any potential risk. At times, nasal polyps may represent cancerous disorders or be a manifestation of a systemic disease process, such as Sarcoidosis and should be biopsied. Medications that reduce inflammation in the nose are often used for treating nasal polyps. Intranasal steroid sprays (Flonase, Rhinocort, Nasonex), sinus irrigations with steroids (Pulmicort/Budesonide), and periodic courses of oral steroids are commonly used. If nasal polyps do not improve with medications, surgical removal can be considered. This is called a polypectomy and is often performed using endoscopes either in the office or operating room. Other common procedures done in the same setting as nasal polypectomy include: sinus balloon dilation (dilation of blocked or narrow sinuses) ,endoscopic sinus surgery (opening blocked sinus passages), & septoplasty (straightening a deviated nasal septum). If you or family members have concerns regarding nasal polyps, please do not hesitate to contact Colden and Seymour Ear, Nose, Throat, and Allergy to set up and appointment. Opinions expressed here are those of Daryl Colden, MD, FACS, and Christopher Jayne, BA. These opinions are not a substitute for a medical evaluation performed by a medical provider.